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February 25, 2022

The public wants the government to protect them from themselves – sometimes

Clareta Treger
In a study of public attitudes towards government paternalism, Clareta Treger finds that, when it comes to their own safety and health, individuals prefer coercive government policies over nudges that steer them towards welfare-enhancing behaviour. This should be taken into consideration when devising strategies to mitigate COVID-19 and future crises.
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November 22, 2021

Bailed-out governments did not lose policy-making discretion during the Eurozone crisis

Catherine Moury
Catherine Moury, Stella Ladi, Daniel Cardoso and Angie Gago argue that bailed-out governments during the Eurozone crisis exercised more leverage than assumed. Despite international market pressure and creditors’ conditionality, bailed-out governments were able to advocate, resist, shape or roll back some of the policies demanded by the EU’s Troika
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September 9, 2021

Argentina's government has lost credibility, risking its chances in forthcoming elections

Sergio Ricardo Quiroga
is, argues Sergio Ricardo Quiroga, undermines the electoral prospects of the main governing party
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August 25, 2021

The new coalition government is the most diverse in Israel's history, and promises real change

Amnon Cavari
In June 2021, after twelve consecutive years as Israel's Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu was forced out of office. The coalition replacing him promises change, find Amnon Cavari, Maoz Rosenthal and Ilana Shpaizman. Whether it delivers on its promises is another question
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June 7, 2021

The ‘levelling up’ agenda of Boris Johnson's government – and why there might be trouble ahead

Jack Newman
Levelling up has become the centrepiece of the UK government’s vision for a post-Brexit and post-Covid Britain. It promises greater equality without anybody losing out, and it appeals to all parts of the political spectrum. But these big promises create major challenges that could be the government’s undoing, argues Jack Newman
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December 15, 2020

The Constitutional Court struck down the Austrian government’s discriminatory welfare policies against migrants and refugees. But that won't prevent social exclusion

Irene Landini
The Austrian government's openly discriminatory policies against migrants have been invalidated by the Constitutional Court and challenged by the European Commission. But, argues Irene Landini, that has not ended ‘welfare chauvinism’ and social exclusion, either in Austria or elsewhere in Europe
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June 7, 2022

♟️ The rise of ‘information autocracies’: Kazakhstan and its constitutional referendum

Bakhytzhan Kurmanov
To understand today’s autocratic regimes, we should look at how they exploit social media, argues Bakhyzhan Kurmanov. In Kazakhstan, a referendum in the name of ‘open government’ is effectively a sham. What's more, it is a cover for autocratic practices of silencing dissent
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March 22, 2023

💊 How lobbying regulation can make democracy work better

Alberto Bitonti
Lobbying regulation is an area where political scientists can help strengthen democracy. We usually analyse the effects of existing regulations, and see why, where, and how they are implemented. But Alberto Bitonti argues we can do much more, helping regulators fix loopholes and understand what they really should aim for
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November 30, 2022

Tokayev consolidates power in Kazakhstan elections

Bakhytzhan Kurmanov
In Kazakhstan’s recent presidential elections, incumbent President Tokayev won an overwhelming majority, further consolidating his rule. Tokayev preaches democratisation. Yet, as Bakhytzhan Kurmanov argues, the elections were hardly democratic, and the reforms he proposes may mask an intent to strengthen his own position rather than empower Kazakh citizens
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May 20, 2024

♟️Pakistan elections: perpetual instability in a military-controlled democracy

Vasabjit Banerjee
Pakistan’s recent elections have produced a two-party ruling coalition, and seemingly ended the confrontation between ex-Prime Minister Imran Khan and his former backers, the military. Yet, while the military’s role as a veto player in Pakistani politics remains unquestioned, its grip is shakier, argue Vasabjit Banerjee and Adnan Rasool.
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The Loop

Cutting-edge analysis showcasing the work of the political science discipline at its best.
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Advancing Political Science
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