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09 2021

Secessionist parties in Western Canada are not likely to succeed

writes Adam Stokes, we also find similar movements in Western Canada. Although such movements are gaining notability in the West, they are not likely to succeed any time soon
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09 2021

The ‘Global South’ and research on world politics

The ‘Global South’ has become a popular meta category in the practice and study of world politics. Making use of its analytical potential, Sebastian Haug argues, requires an explicit engagement with definitions, meanings and the implications of taken-for-granted framings
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09 2021

What AfD can(not) expect from this Sunday’s general election

Alternative für Deutschland is not expected to make gains at this Sunday’s general election in Germany, yet it is essential to scrutinise the party’s strongholds, writes Manès Weisskircher. AfD’s strength in the east is not just relevant for the party's future. It may also shape German politics in the medium term
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09 2021

The demise of neoliberalism and the dawn of a new era of ‘neo-statism’

The era of neoliberalism began with Thatcher and Reagan. Paolo Gerbaudo argues that it is crumbling before our eyes. Replacing it is a new era of ‘neo-statism’, the exact parameters of which are not yet fully shaped
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09 2021

🦋 Why the concept of democracy, and data collection, matter

Tetsuki Tamura argues we need a better and wider concept of democracy to capture democratic practices in unlikely places, such as the family
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09 2021

The EU’s human rights policy is deficient, but not in the way you might think

The EU often faces criticism for conducting an inconsistent and arbitrary human rights policy. This critique is misguided and overlooks a more fundamental problem with the policy, argues Johanne Døhlie Saltnes: that it tends to be executive-driven, precluding the participation of individuals and affected groups
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09 2021

🦋 What is democracy? An empirical response to the Butterfly Collector

Jean-Paul Gagnon's original blog in this series asked ‘what is democracy?’ Leonardo Morlino brings an empirical perspective to this question. Contextualising and unpacking it, he then develops an empirical strategy of research for democrats to follow
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09 2021

How dictators try, but ultimately fail, to create loyal bureaucrats

Dictators depend on committed bureaucrats to stay in power. To instil loyalty, some indoctrinate through enforced military service. Alexander De Juan, Felix Haaß, and Jan Pierskalla warn that this strategy can backfire. Rather than creating truly convinced cadres, conscription can help bureaucrats get better at faking loyalty
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09 2021

🦋 Gagnon’s 'data mountain': a lookout point for revolutions to come

Building a ‘dictionary of democracies’, as Jean-Paul Gagnon proposes, will not render a revolution of democratic theory. Yet the data mountain may be a valuable point of departure for a 'decentred' understanding of democracy and, in consequence, for several theoretical, empirical, and political innovations, writes Dannica Fleuß
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09 2021

Threats to states’ identity are equally important as threats to state borders

States face not just threats to their physical security, but also to their sense of self and biographical continuity. This is what we call securitisation. Understanding the process of securitisation can uncover taken-for-granted colonial and imperial influences that would otherwise remain hidden, writes Gabriella Gricius
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THE EUROPEAN CONSORTIUM FOR POLITICAL RESEARCH
Advancing Political Science
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