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06 2022

'The people' goes to the Capitol

How should we interpret what happened on 6 January 2021 at the Capitol? Lasse Thomassen argues that, while populists like Trump may threaten democracy, we cannot simply dismiss populism and the populist mob without taking something away from it that we value: its inherent openness
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06 2022

Westminster has a moral obligation to allow a second Scottish independence referendum

The first obstacle in holding an Independence Referendum is assuring its legitimacy. To do so, says Ruairidh Brown, the SNP-Green alliance have implied the UK Government has no moral authority to deny Scots a choice on their future
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06 2022

Russia's failures in Ukraine could threaten its domestic stability

With the Russian invasion of Ukraine reduced to a protracted battle for the Donbas, discontent grows in Russian military and ultranationalist circles. This could lead to the formation of paramilitary groups aiming for a Russia of the revolutionary right, says Alexandr Burilkov
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06 2022

🦋 The open texture of democracy

Democracy comes in lots of different flavours. How do we make sense of this? Is having all these meanings a feature or a bug? John Capps suggests that the idea of 'open texture' can help us better understand democratic theory and practice
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06 2022

How the Coalition for Quebec's Future changed the game on Québécois nationalism

Québécois politics has been undergoing a dramatic change since 2018. The emergence of the ‘Coalition for Quebec’s Future’ (CAQ) has smashed the existing Liberal/Parti Québécois duopoly in the province and sidelined the issue of Quebec’s sovereignty in favour of cultural issues, writes Adam Stokes
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06 2022

🦋 Democracy: by design and on the move

Democracy today is a colonial artefact tied to violent borders. Moreover, it produces an increasing number of non-citizens, unable to participate in democracy where they live. Erica Dorn and Federico Vaz argue that Gagnon's courageous enquiry into defining the historical landscape of democracy can bring more equity to its current – unjust – paradigm
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06 2022

The invasion of Ukraine is preventing a truce in the war on nature

The Russian invasion of Ukraine has reduced media coverage of the political violence and turmoil elsewhere in the world caused by climate change, as well as causing a retreat on climate change policy targets by richer democracies. Ian Budge highlights what needs to be done and how
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06 2022

Why we're entering a new age of 'Ecocene politics'

ntal loss does not announce the age of humans, but that of ecology. Mihnea Tănăsescu argues we have entered the Ecocene, the time when ecological processes reign supreme in terms of political ideas and ways of living with disruptive change
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06 2022

Russia’s quasi-colonial dependence on China

he Russian invasion of Ukraine has exposed Russia’s growing dependence on China, argues Albrecht Rothacher. China’s ambitions to displace the US as the main world power contrast vividly with Russia’s long-term stagnation and decline. It's a decline exacerbated by the latest Western economic sanctions
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06 2022

To what extent is democracy in decline worldwide?

Many observers say that democracy has undergone a large-scale global decline in recent decades. However, presenting evidence differently leads us to different conclusions. This calls for increased caution and reflection among those discussing democratic trends, writes Svend-Erik Skaaning
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THE EUROPEAN CONSORTIUM FOR POLITICAL RESEARCH
Advancing Political Science
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