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May 22, 2024

⛓️ What is political science for? A comment on ECPR’s silence over Gaza

Last month, a group of scholars submitted an open letter to ECPR's Executive Committee, calling upon it to condemn the Israeli military campaign in Gaza. ECPR declined. This, says Vladimir Bortun, was a missed opportunity. Here, he argues that the political science community should use the catastrophe in Gaza to open up debate about the mission of ECPR – and about the very purpose of political science
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May 21, 2024

LGBTQ vote can keep far-right forces at bay in the forthcoming EP election

Far-right parties are growing increasingly hostile towards LGBTQ rights. In the forthcoming European Parliament elections, such parties are expected to gain significant ground. Michal Grahn shows that non-straight voters might, through mobilisation, help keep far-right forces at bay
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May 20, 2024

♟️Pakistan elections: perpetual instability in a military-controlled democracy

Pakistan’s recent elections have produced a two-party ruling coalition, and seemingly ended the confrontation between ex-Prime Minister Imran Khan and his former backers, the military. Yet, while the military’s role as a veto player in Pakistani politics remains unquestioned, its grip is shakier, argue Vasabjit Banerjee and Adnan Rasool.
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May 16, 2024

🔮 Do European left-wing populists in government become more moderate?

Jan Philipp Thomeczek argues that European left-wing populist parties become more moderate as a consequence of their participation in government. Here, he draws on recent examples from Spain, Greece and Germany.
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May 15, 2024

Why terminating sanctions is more difficult than initiating them

Olga Vlasova delves into the intricacies of economic sanctions termination. Scrutinising global data and exploring historical precedents, she uncovers the complexities surrounding the lifting of sanctions, and how rarely they are lifted. Her analysis offers valuable insights for policymakers navigating the delicate balance of international relations.
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May 14, 2024

Why communal conflict should be viewed as a wartime phenomenon

Violent local conflicts over land and resources are taking place almost exclusively in civil war-affected societies. Claudia Wiehler and Sebastian van Baalen argue that analysts and peacebuilding practitioners therefore need to involve civil war parties in communal conflict management and resolution — and view them as potential conflict management parties.
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May 13, 2024

♟️ Russia’s mercenaries are bolstering autocratic regimes in the Sahel

The spate of coups in the Sahel has been advantageous for Russia. Marcel Plichta and Christopher Faulkner argue that Moscow's mercenaries in the Sahel aren't to blame for the democratic retrenchment, but their presence is insulating and emboldening military dictators on their path to autocratic consolidation.
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May 10, 2024

🔮 Why Italian political parties use populist rhetoric on social media

Analysing posts on Facebook and Twitter-X, Andrea Ceron, Silvia Decadri, and Fedra Negri highlight how Italian politicians use populist rhetoric to generate engagement. They find that such rhetoric does indeed increase the likelihood of posts going viral, even among non-populist voters
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May 9, 2024

The democratic legitimacy of the European Union

As we approach the the European Parliament elections, from 6–9 June, Jaap Hoeksma argues that the European Union has resolved its problems of democratic legitimacy by becoming a democratic international organisation
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May 8, 2024

'None of the above': how to improve compulsory voting requirements

Compulsory voting boosts turnout but has also negative consequences, such as increasing invalid voting. Furthermore, it gives voters, including newly enfranchised youth, few opportunities to express discontent or disinterest. Shane P. Singh, Carolina Plescia and Sylvia Kritzinger argue that we could solve this by introducing a 'none-of-the-above' (NOTA) option
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THE EUROPEAN CONSORTIUM FOR POLITICAL RESEARCH
Advancing Political Science
© 2024 European Consortium for Political Research. The ECPR is a charitable incorporated organisation (CIO) number 1167403 ECPR, Harbour House, 6-8 Hythe Quay, Colchester, CO2 8JF, United Kingdom.
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