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June 1, 2021

How minipublics can help democracy – even if the wider public can’t take part

Lisa Van Dijk In representative democracies, many citizens feel disconnected from those who make political decisions on their behalf. In extreme cases, they may even refuse to accept democratic decisions and contemplate alternative forms of government. Lisa van Dijk, James Pow and Sofie Marien test the effectiveness of ‘minipublics’ to offset these problems Read more
May 28, 2021

In search of legitimacy: the Chilean road to a new constitution

Julieta Suárez-Cao Chile’s constitutional reform started after massive social protests in 2019. With gender parity, reserved seats for indigenous people, and a significant number of seats for independent delegates, Julieta Suarez-Cao argues that the country's assembly is on track to rebuild democratic legitimacy in the years to come Read more
May 27, 2021

How mainstream parties respond to the populist challenge

Fabian Habersack Populist radical right parties have been remarkably successful in recent decades, yet strategies to contain them regularly fail. Can non-radical parties do anything to counter them? Fabian Habersack suggests mainstream parties could signal ‘responsiveness’ while remaining committed to their policy goals Read more
May 25, 2021

Voters can close the gender gap in Latvia's forthcoming municipal elections

Laura Dean Candidate lists in Latvia contain only 38.6% women. Latvia is unlikely to improve women’s representation in its municipal elections unless Latvian voters adopt preference voting, and 'plus' their women candidates, writes Laura Dean Read more
May 24, 2021

How corruption drives political participation – and the people most likely to mobilise

Martín Portos The fight against corruption has been at the heart of recent mass protests across the world. But does corruption drive political participation, and if so, who is it mobilising? Research by Raffaele Bazurli and Martín Portos suggests – counterintuitively – that people with less education are the most likely to rise up Read more
May 22, 2021

Vaccine prices may become a political powder keg

Felix Stein Taking health equity seriously during the pandemic requires some minimal degree of vaccine price control. Countries should make vaccine contract details public, specify a fair price, and outline how they plan to meet it, argues Felix Stein Read more
May 21, 2021

'I can't breathe!' – but this time, it's India

Vittorio Bufacchi India is the seventh-richest country in the world. Yet it recently recorded the highest-ever daily death toll from Covid-19. It's a disaster, write Vittorio Bufacchi and Urmi Bhattacharyya, caused by India’s gross inequalities, along with misguided political decisions and policies throughout the country's pandemic response Read more
May 20, 2021

Religious freedom under attack in France

Emmanuelle Bertout Religious freedom is deteriorating in France. Laws aimed at maintaining the confessional neutrality of the French state are turning into attacks on individuals’ right to religious freedom, writes Emmanuelle Bertout In February 2021, the French National Assembly adopted the highly controversial bill Consolidating the Principles of the Republic. The Senate followed suit in April. The […] Read more

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Advancing Political Science
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