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November 11, 2022

Against misinformation as method in political science

Matthew Barnfield Political scientists use experimental methods to study cause-and-effect relationships in politics. Sometimes these approaches involve exposing people to false information about their political reality. Matthew Barnfield argues that this practice of misinformation is not only unethical, but also an ineffective way of learning about the political world Read more
November 10, 2022

🦋 Making and keeping democracy visible

Christoph Mohamad-Klotzbach One aim of the sciences of the democracies is to find different ways of making and keeping democracy visible, argues Christoph Mohamad-Klotzbach. Practitioners and imaginers of democracies are doing this job. They help to understand and transform the realities of democracies – step by step – for the sake of democracy Read more
November 9, 2022

Putin’s nuclear weapons talk is a bluff, but one with significant consequences

Albrecht Rothacher President Putin has been clear in his intentions to use all force necessary, including nuclear weapons, to achieve his goals. This, argues Albrecht Rothacher, is a bluff, but its very use has hugely damaging consequences for international relations Read more
November 8, 2022

Why Meloni’s victory in the Italian election was no surprise

Dario Mazzola By the time Italians went to the polls in September, the victory of Giorgia Meloni’s Brothers of Italy party was a foregone conclusion. Dario Mazzola articulates the factors that led to the formation of the most right-wing government in the history of the Italian Republic Read more
November 7, 2022

Power competition will bring new opportunities – and crises – for small powers

Marius Ghincea As we enter a new period of great power competition, small powers across the world are presented with novel opportunities. However, small states also face crises that will test their resilience. Marius Ghincea argues that only those states which can build resilience and cross-group cohesion will reap the spoils of emerging power competition Read more
November 4, 2022

How far-right groups survive against all the odds

Sabine Volk Germany’s largest far-right protest movement, PEGIDA, this month celebrates eight years of mobilisation and protest activity. Its survival, argues Sabine Volk, is a puzzle not explained by social movement theory. She explores an overlooked explanatory factor: PEGIDA's repetitive protest ritual Read more
November 4, 2022

Sanctions on Russia: short-term survival, long-term destitution

Albrecht Rothacher Albrecht Rothacher assesses the impact of sanctions on the Russian economy. He argues that, in the short-term, sanctions will have little impact – except on the peoples of Europe whose governments are imposing them. Yet, the long-term implications for the Russian economy could be more far-reaching, if not devastating Read more
November 3, 2022

Italy’s changing international outlook under Meloni

Massimo D'Angelo On 21 October 2022, Giorgia Meloni became the first female Italian Prime Minister. She is also the head of the most right-wing government in the history of the Republic. Massimo D’Angelo explores the implications for Italy’s foreign policy and European outlook, as well as the lure of authoritarianism in some European governments Read more

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Advancing Political Science
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