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November 15, 2021

Electoral systems and the futility of ‘tactical’ voting

Costas Panayotakis Costas Panayotakis recently exposed the fiction in the ‘Every Vote Counts’ thesis. Here, he explores the implications of that fiction for different electoral systems, notably those based on Proportional Representation and First Past the Post. In so doing, he reveals the futility of tactical voting Read more
October 29, 2021

In a democracy, does every vote count?

Costas Panayotakis Costas Panayotakis analyses the popular claim that 'every vote counts' in a democracy. He finds it is based on false assumptions and a misunderstanding of statistical probability. Voting and democratic participation, he concludes, are not based on individualistic self-interest but on some degree of idealism and solidarity Read more
June 11, 2021

Polling booth, postal ballot or internet? The voting-mode preferences of Americans

Carolina Plescia Interest in postal voting has increased during the pandemic as a means to avoid in-person contact. But exactly who is choosing to vote by mail? Carolina Plescia, Semra Sevi and André Blais find that the biggest cleavage in US citizen preferences about how to vote is generational, not ideological Read more
May 5, 2021

Searching for the structural roots of the storming of the Capitol: economic inequality and the role of the ultra-rich

Alberto Parmigiani To understand the storming of the US Capitol, we must consider its possible roots in economic inequality. This, along with economic elites' ability to transform material wealth into political clout, have contributed to record political polarisation in the US today, writes Alberto Parmigiani Read more
February 24, 2021

Trump’s acquittal reminds us that we are still very much living in the post-truth age

Ruairidh Brown In Trump’s second impeachment trial, ‘truth’ never really mattered, writes Ruairidh Brown. Regardless of the facts or evidence presented, the endurance of a post-truth climate guaranteed he would be acquitted regardless Read more
January 19, 2021

Clientelism – another reason to worry about US democracy

Rachel Gisselquist The last several months have given us many reasons to worry about US democracy – not least the riot at the US Capitol and the president’s refusal to accept the results of the November election, with Republican support. Rachel Gisselquist argues that clientelism is yet another reason to worry Read more
November 16, 2020

Biden's narrow victory means power-sharing with the Republicans

Richard Johnson Joe Biden won the American presidential election, but by such a narrow margin that, when combined with the outcome of the congressional elections, and especially the possibility of a Republican-controlled Senate, his power to achieve much is likely to be severely constrained, writes Richard Johnson Read more
October 28, 2020

How we can learn from South Korea and Singapore in their responses to Covid-19: the ‘precautionary principle’

Kannen Ramsamy Covid-19 is a crisis caused by scientific and evidential uncertainty. Kannen Ramsamy argues that adopting the so-called ‘precautionary principle’ in developing policy responses is crucial. Countries that have not done so, such as the US and Sweden, are now paying a heavy price Read more

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THE EUROPEAN CONSORTIUM FOR POLITICAL RESEARCH
Advancing Political Science
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