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economic inequality

January 28, 2022

A second 'Pink Tide’ rises in Latin America, but will it last?

Valesca Lima The advance of left-wing, progressive parties in Latin America is driven by the mismanagement of the pandemic, the economic crisis, and the failure of right-wing populism in the region, observes Valesca Lima Read more
January 17, 2022

Recent protests in Kazakhstan expose the fragility of the autocratic regime

Angelo Vito Panaro Unprecedented anti-government protests spread across Kazakhstan in January 2022, andwere only quelled through a military solution. Angelo Vito Panaro argues that, despite the outcome, the protests expose the inherent fragility of the autocratic regime and the strength of public support for a democratic alternative Read more
October 26, 2021

Democratic regimes influence income inequality – but not necessarily how we expect

Mathew Wong Mathew Wong revisits the relationship between democracy and income inequality by focusing on popular preferences. He argues that whether people view redistribution to be a central democratic characteristic is not inevitable but conditional. And that, paradoxically, democracy is associated with less inequality only if fewer people hold this idea Read more
October 1, 2021

People with a civic European identity are more likely to support EU cohesion policy

Nicholas Charron Citizens across Europe identify with Europe in different ways. Those with a civic conception of what it means to ‘be European’ are more supportive of sharing resources across borders. Those that identify with Europe based on religion are much more sceptical, write Nicholas Charron and Monika Bauhr Read more
August 31, 2021

Covid vaccine apartheid and the failure of global cooperation

Stephen Brown After the pandemic hit, scientists rapidly developed vaccines effective in preventing infection, serious illness and death. These breakthroughs presented humanity with an important test: could we deal with Covid-19 from a truly global perspective? Stephen Brown argues it's a test we are clearly failing Read more
August 9, 2021

Left-wing austerity during international crises – it’s the financial markets, stupid!

Damian Raess Surprisingly, left governments adopted more conservative fiscal policies than right governments in recent economic crises. Governments did not choose these policies freely; rather, the financial markets imposed them. Nonetheless, argues Damian Raess, they appear to have dire electoral consequences: left-leaning voters are increasingly voting with their feet Read more
June 24, 2021

The G7 global minimum corporate tax lacks global anchoring

Anna Guildea The global minimum corporate tax will help countries retain wealth. Yet, writes Anna Guildea, a truly ‘global’ corporate tax must originate from fora more inclusive than the G7 Read more
June 7, 2021

The ‘levelling up’ agenda of Boris Johnson's government – and why there might be trouble ahead

Jack Newman Levelling up has become the centrepiece of the UK government’s vision for a post-Brexit and post-Covid Britain. It promises greater equality without anybody losing out, and it appeals to all parts of the political spectrum. But these big promises create major challenges that could be the government’s undoing, argues Jack Newman Read more

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Advancing Political Science
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