Sort Articles

political protest

January 18, 2022

Social class: an important determinant for protest mobilisation

Ivaylo Dinev More than one-third of all protest events in Bulgaria and Slovenia since the Great Recession were class-based. Workers’ mobilisations show durability, contends Ivaylo Dinev, though differences between sectors continue to exist Read more
October 20, 2021

🌊 Civil society organisations under pressure in the world’s biggest democracy

Soumi Banerjee Soumi Banerjee and Rishi Jha argue that the rising wave of illiberalism is causing a shift in state-civil society relationships around the world. In contemporary India, the government often targets NGOs, resulting in the partial or complete seizure of operations Read more
October 18, 2021

Small-scale social movements don't make news, but can influence higher education policy

Didem Türkoğlu Massive student protests attract media attention, but less globally televised protests might also help shape policy-making, writes Didem Türkoğlu. Even lesser-known movements can build alliances and put pressure on opposition parties to 'own' activists' issues. To trace these influences, however, we must pay closer attention to local and national news Read more
September 1, 2021

Tunisia’s democracy is under challenge, but not under threat

Hager Ali Over recent weeks, Western pundits have been quick to claim recent events in Tunisia are evidence of a ‘failed democracy experiment’. But Hager Ali and Ameni Mehrez argue that the protests are more a testament to democratic resilience than failure Read more
May 28, 2021

In search of legitimacy: the Chilean road to a new constitution

Julieta Suárez-Cao Chile’s constitutional reform started after massive social protests in 2019. With gender parity, reserved seats for indigenous people, and a significant number of seats for independent delegates, Julieta Suarez-Cao argues that the country's assembly is on track to rebuild democratic legitimacy in the years to come Read more
May 24, 2021

How corruption drives political participation – and the people most likely to mobilise

Martín Portos The fight against corruption has been at the heart of recent mass protests across the world. But does corruption drive political participation, and if so, who is it mobilising? Research by Raffaele Bazurli and Martín Portos suggests – counterintuitively – that people with less education are the most likely to rise up Read more
May 6, 2021

How states manage international censure: Norway's response to criticism of its Child Welfare Services

Kristin Haugevik When states are criticised, they normally recognise, reject or counter the critique. Yet they could listen to and contain criticism without directly rejecting or recognising it. Using criticism of Norway’s Child Welfare Services as an example, Kristin Haugevik and Cecilie Basberg Neumann show that diplomatic containment can prevent conflict accelerating and then damaging bilateral relations […] Read more
April 19, 2021

Brexit’s collateral damage: peace in Northern Ireland

Feargal Cochrane Twenty-three years after the Good Friday Agreement, the political atmosphere in Northern Ireland has reached boiling point. The underlying cause of recent unrest, writes Feargal Cochrane, is Brexit and its particular ramifications for Northern Ireland Read more

The Loop

Cutting-edge analysis showcasing the work of the political science discipline at its best.
Read more
THE EUROPEAN CONSORTIUM FOR POLITICAL RESEARCH
Advancing Political Science
© 2020 European Consortium for Political Research. The ECPR is a charitable incorporated organisation (CIO) number 1167403 ECPR, Harbour House, 6-8 Hythe Quay, Colchester, CO2 8JF, United Kingdom.
linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram