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democracy

January 24, 2022

🦋 Selection: the key to studying democracy and innovation

Frank Hendriks Jean-Paul Gagnon takes biology as a model but overlooks that it is driven by variation as well as selection. The study of it, therefore, is sensitive to both. The study of democracy and innovation must be too, asserts Frank Hendriks Read more
January 19, 2022

🦋 To defend democracy, understand it

Benjamin Abrams Democracy is in danger, and autocrats are becoming bolder and bolder. Benjamin Abrams argues that our failure to understand democracy stops us from effectively defending it. To protect democracy, we need to understand what it means, what kind we have, and what it can become Read more
January 14, 2022

🦋 Untangling description, deception and denunciation: a linguistic twist to the Science of Democracy

Rikki Dean Jean-Paul Gagnon has amassed over 4,000 ‘linguistic artefacts’ into a data mountain of descriptions of democracy. Yet, notes Rikki Dean, a sustained consideration of these linguistic artefacts as language is missing from his Science of Democracy and its responses. Words do not only describe, they also deceive and denounce Read more
January 12, 2022

China’s approach to the pandemic exposes its democratic deficit to the public glare

Rongxin Li China has adopted a zero-case approach to the coronacrisis. But, writes Rongxin Li, China’s policies, while claiming to be in the interests of its citizens, show a lack of democratic anchoring, sacrificing civil rights and procedural justice Read more
November 11, 2021

🦋 Lost in translation? Democracy and its non-English variants

Ryusaku Yamada Based on English language terms, Jean-Paul Gagnon’s democracy data mountain faces considerable problems in translating non-English words which have no exact equivalents. Ryusaku Yamada uses the example of ‘mass’ (as in ‘mass democracy’), and a Japanese word, ‘taishū’, to reveal the potential comprehension gap in any translation exercise Read more
October 26, 2021

Democratic regimes influence income inequality – but not necessarily how we expect

Mathew Wong Mathew Wong revisits the relationship between democracy and income inequality by focusing on popular preferences. He argues that whether people view redistribution to be a central democratic characteristic is not inevitable but conditional. And that, paradoxically, democracy is associated with less inequality only if fewer people hold this idea Read more
October 14, 2021

Medical science as a model for research on democracy

Richard Rose Using hands-on methods to diagnose the democratic body politic can identify parts that consistently function as they should and which intermittently don’t work, writes Richard Rose. This knowledge can lead to more effective remedies for intermittent ailments. It also guards against predicting the death of democracy from chronic disabilities that can be managed Read more
October 4, 2021

🦋 Not deliberating about democracies is a deadly trap

Patricia Roberts-Miller Responding to Jean-Paul Gagnon’s blog on the science of democracy, Patricia Roberts-Miller recalls 'Thucydides' trap' to explain the dangers of forcing one meaning of democracy over others, as happened during the Athenian Empire. Silencing other democracies harms people through wars overseas and suppression at home. And it can, in turn, ruin those very democracies that are doing the silencing Read more

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THE EUROPEAN CONSORTIUM FOR POLITICAL RESEARCH
Advancing Political Science
© 2020 European Consortium for Political Research. The ECPR is a charitable incorporated organisation (CIO) number 1167403 ECPR, Harbour House, 6-8 Hythe Quay, Colchester, CO2 8JF, United Kingdom.
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