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Democracy

🦋 How do we translate the meaning of democracy across cultural divides?

October 15, 2021

🦋 Democracy preserves dignity, a means to an end, not an end itself

October 14, 2021

Medical science as a model for research on democracy

October 14, 2021

🦋 A democratic philosophy for democracy’s data mountain? 

October 8, 2021

🦋 Not deliberating about democracies is a deadly trap

October 4, 2021
September 28, 2021

🦋 The tension between the singular and multivarious conceptions of democracy

Marcin Kaim The merit of Jean-Paul Gagnon’s project is that it calls attention to the friction between singular and plural conception of democracy. While this is a well-known topic in democratic theory, it does not remain central. However, writes Marcin Kaim, a lexicon, and therefore a 'total texture' of democracy, could bring about a change Read more
September 27, 2021

Sport and politics do mix, but match results don’t swing elections

Stefan Müller Several studies have suggested that 'irrelevant events' outside politicians’ control, like sports results or lotteries, affect voting behaviour. Such findings raise worrying questions for democracy. Yet, write Stefan Müller and Liam Kneafsey, these concerns may be overstated. In Ireland, a country with a strong sporting tradition, match outcomes do not influence citizens’ assessments of government performance, or voting behaviour Read more
September 20, 2021

🦋 Why the concept of democracy, and data collection, matter

Tetsuki Tamura Tetsuki Tamura argues we need a better and wider concept of democracy to capture democratic practices in unlikely places, such as the family Read more
September 16, 2021

🦋 What is democracy? An empirical response to the Butterfly Collector

Leonardo Morlino Jean-Paul Gagnon's original blog in this series asked ‘what is democracy?’ Leonardo Morlino brings an empirical perspective to this question. Contextualising and unpacking it, he then develops an empirical strategy of research for democrats to follow Read more
September 16, 2021

How dictators try, but ultimately fail, to create loyal bureaucrats

Alexander De Juan Dictators depend on committed bureaucrats to stay in power. To instil loyalty, some indoctrinate through enforced military service. Alexander De Juan, Felix Haaß, and Jan Pierskalla warn that this strategy can backfire. Rather than creating truly convinced cadres, conscription can help bureaucrats get better at faking loyalty Read more

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THE EUROPEAN CONSORTIUM FOR POLITICAL RESEARCH
Advancing Political Science
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