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Musk’s Twitter takeover has damaged its popularity, but it may yet survive

November 24, 2022

🌊 Resisting autocratisation

October 12, 2022

♟️ The rise of ‘information autocracies’: Kazakhstan and its constitutional referendum

June 7, 2022

We need rebellion to confront new disruptive technologies

May 16, 2022

International Women's Day and citizen engagement on social media

March 10, 2022
February 3, 2022

Covid-19 disinformation: how smaller untruths can be more infectious than hard lies

Michael Hameleers Michael Hameleers explains his team's experimental results: that COVID-19 disinformation is most credible – and dangerous – when it stays close to objective facts. This in turn has implications for how disinformation can be countered. Read more
January 19, 2022

🦋 To defend democracy, understand it

Benjamin Abrams Democracy is in danger, and autocrats are becoming bolder and bolder. Benjamin Abrams argues that our failure to understand democracy stops us from effectively defending it. To protect democracy, we need to understand what it means, what kind we have, and what it can become Read more
June 16, 2021

How ‘mask diplomacy’ helps cultivate a positive image of China abroad

Samuel Brazys China seeks to control the international narrative on its role in the pandemic. But while Beijing cannot always deflect criticism, its mask diplomacy efforts and external propaganda streams do affect China’s image, write Samuel Brazys, Alexander Dukalskis and Stefan Müller Read more
April 8, 2021

Conspiracy theories are everywhere amid the pandemic. Politicians should face up to their role in helping to peddle them

Annemarie Walter During the coronacrisis, conspiracy theories have proliferated, and politicians who use them for political gain are – at least partly – to blame. Let the January attack on the US Capitol be a warning to Europe, write Annemarie Walter and Hugo Drochon Read more
March 19, 2021

How tweets can help us make sense of internal party politics

Daniel Braby Identifying the different positions of MPs inside the same political parties is a longstanding problem for political science. Daniel Braby and Marius Sältzer argue that applying automated content analysis to MPs' Twitter timelines offers a robust impression of sub-party positions Read more

The Loop

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Advancing Political Science
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